Letters – Austin-based parade entry shocks, embarrases guests


As a life-long resident of Lockhart, I found myself disheartened and a little disgusted with the performance of a particular entry at this year”s Chisholm Trail Parade.
The group called themselves the Texas Two Steppers (or something to that effect), a dance troupe from Austin comprised of young girls, 10 – 15 years old.
I”m in full support of the arts and all fo

r young people taking an interest and taking part in extracurricular activities, as long as they are socially and developmentally appropriate. I was not the only spectator at this year”s parade whose jaw hit the pavement when these young girls came to a halt in front of City Hall and began gyrating their entire bodies to some equally explicit lyrics.
That kind of “entertainment” is better suited for some place that requires a cover charge, drink minimum, and age requirement. The CTR Parade is a family event, not some place you”d expect to see young ladies dressed so scantily, performing to music that contains words your mother would wash your mouth out with soap for using.
A few of these girls shorts were so short that their bottoms were exposed!
I write this at the risk of sounding prudish, but where is the decency? It was 11 a.m. at an annual event sponsored by the city”s largest financial institution, and this is the best we could do? I get it – society as a whole has become more tolerant of the MTV generation”s antics, but where do we draw the line? Have parade sponsors become so desperate for community support that they”re allowing this kind of lewdness to pass as fun for the whole family?
In short, I”m shocked.
While the parade as a whole was rated G and pleasantly entertaining, that sole entry was a true eye sore on what should have been, as in years past, an event we remember for its elaborate floats, the Ben Hur clowns in their tiny cars and all the other proud entrants who take the time to participate.
I hope that in the future, more consideration is given to the expectation of the city and the image portrayed when these kinds of performances are allowed to pass for public entertainment.
Robin Guerra


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